Women rights in the middle east

Employment[ edit ] Women throughout the Middle East earn less than men although there are labour laws in place that dictate equal opportunities for promotion and training and equal pay for the same type of work. These labour laws are frequently violated in regards to not only salary but also benefits such as loans for senior officials or housing allowances.

Women rights in the middle east

Some common refrains might refer to the freedom, or lack thereof, of dress; to the burdensome female role of wife and mother in the household; or even to the right to drive.

However, like any place in the world, there is a spectrum of varied lived experiences, due to such factors as class, social customs, geographical location, family traditions, exposure to other cultures through trade, and so on.

When covering a charged subject like gender in the Middle East, it is important to consider context: What are the priorities of Saudi women besides driving?

How do Muslim girls and women feel about covering their hair? With significant attention paid to the plight of girls and women, what are we missing by not looking more deeply at the lives of boys and men?

Here are some basic materials to begin unraveling the misconceptions in order to gain a more balanced understanding of social issues based on primary resources, regional examples, and different types of literature.

More Rights Than One Might Think Some Americans believe that Muslim women are oppressed by their religion, forced to cover themselves completely, and denied education and other basic rights.

It is true that Muslim women, like women all over the world, have struggled against inequality and restrictive practices in education, work force participation, and family roles. Many of these oppressive practices, however, do not come from Islam itself, but are part of local cultural traditions. To think about the difference between religion and culture, ask yourself if the high rate of domestic violence in the United States is related to Christianity, the predominant religion.

In fact, Islam gives women a number of rights, some of which were not enjoyed by Western women until the 19th century. For example, untilthe property of women in England was given to their husbands when they married, but Muslim women always retained their own assets. Muslim women could specify conditions in their marriage contracts, such as the right to divorce should their husband take another wife.

Also, Muslim women in many countries keep their own last name after marriage. Men are expected to care for their mothers and any unmarried female relatives, and would, it is reasoned, need greater resources for this purpose. The author of this section, Ms. Iran is seemingly at odds with a majority of the world.

In a country governed by a strict, theocratic constitution, though, women have been at the fore in confronting the heavy restrictions imposed after the revolution.

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We will mention some of the more prominent examples of Iranian women who are making significant strides by simply pursuing their passions.

These examples include the aforementioned musician, the significance of feminist Iranian cinema, and an inadvertent representative of a nationwide protest movement.

Salome is recognized as the first female hip-hop artist in Iran. In a genre dominated by men irrespective of national borders, and known for its blatantly misogynistic messages, Salome has naturally turned a few heads. She considers herself apolitical but addresses personal, political, and social subjects in her music and poetry.

Creative measures have been devised to circumvent these rules but significant amounts of time and energy are spent trying to obtain permits to perform from the ministry of culture and Islamic guidance.

Iranian cinema is renowned for its ability to make public, delicate taboo issues such as identity, relationships, divorce, infertility, drug use, and domestic abuse that are generally understood to be private, family issues.

Saudi Arabia, under the initiative of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, gave women in the kingdom the right to drive. Saudi Arabia has been the only country in the world to ban women from driving. The legal status of women in the modern Middle East has been in transition since the early part of the twentieth century. Customary laws, Islamic laws, imported European laws, and reformed versions of Islamic laws affect women in" Varying degrees in the different Middle Eastern legal systems, and the status of women does not seem to have been settled in any of them. May 10,  · While the rest of the world commemorated International Women's Day on March 8, women in the Middle East had less to celebrate than most.

Filmmakers depict the daily struggles women endure as a result of a patriarchal, conservative and traditional society.Women in the Middle East Although there is no gender equality in the Middle East (including in Israel), the phenomena of sexism and misogyny are global—not peculiar to Islam, or to the Middle East.

By As’ad AbuKhalil, October 11, The legal status of women in the Middle East is currently unstable and problematic. It is clear that whatever progress was made in the area of women's rights is not irreversible.

Women rights in the middle east

The previous situation, where a Westernized political elite imposed legal reforms on societies that were still largely very traditional, may now be reversed. Explore Middle East/North Africa Middle East/North Africa. August 17, Women's Rights. June 5, Support Us. Middle East and North Africa Division goldsteinricky.

Human rights in the Middle East Jump to navigation Jump to search. The Women throughout the Middle East earn less than men although there are labour laws in place that dictate equal opportunities for promotion and training and equal pay for the same type of work.

From Jordan to the United Arab Emirates, a look at women's rights across the Arab world on the occasion of International Women's Day.

Jordan Women can travel . While the rest of the world commemorated International Women's Day on March 8, women in the Middle East had less to celebrate than most.

Though women around the globe have made substantial.

Middle East/North Africa | World | | Human Rights Watch