Blaise pascals influence on mathematics and science

His mother, Antoinette, died when he was only three, leaving his father to raise the sickly Blaise and his two sisters, Gilberte and Jacqueline. Davidson He did not trust his son's education to the local schools and took it upon himself to teach Blaise at home.

Blaise pascals influence on mathematics and science

This is largely attributable to his intriguing, enigmatic personality. To read him is to come into direct contact with both his strangeness and his charm. It is also to encounter a tangle of incongruities and seeming contradictions.

Modern readers are usually shocked to discover that the father of gambling odds and the mechanical computer wore a spiked girdle to chastise himself and further mortify a body already tormented by recurrent illness and chronic pain.

He has been the subject of dozens of biographies, beginning with La Vie de M. The implied form is that of a well-made play with classic five-act structure.

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Both views are oversimplified. First of all, at no point during his lifetime was Pascal ever a libertine or libre-penseur. Similarly, since Pascal was a lifelong supporter of the Catholic faith, and since he also maintained an interest in scientific and mathematical problems well after his commitment to Jansenism and Port-Royal, it seems unfair to portray Blaise pascals influence on mathematics and science final years as a betrayal of his scientific principles rather than as an intensification or culmination of his religious views.

Pascal was named for his paternal uncle as well as for St. Blaise, the 3rd-century Armenian saint martyred by having his flesh flayed by iron carding combs as his namesake would later punish his own flesh by wearing a belt studded with sharp nails.

Jacqueline displayed an early literary genius and earned acclaim as a poet and dramatist before becoming a nun at Port-Royal. Pascal was a sickly child who suffered various pains and diseases throughout his life.

According to a family anecdote related by his niece, at age one he supposedly fell victim to a strange illness. His abdomen became distended and swollen, and the slightest annoyance triggered fits of crying and screaming.

This affliction supposedly continued for more than a year, and the child often seemed on the verge of death. The woman reportedly fell to the floor and promised to divulge everything if her life would be spared.

She confessed that in a moment of anger and resentment she had cast a spell on the child — a fatal spell that could be undone only by having it transferred to some other living creature.

Blaise Pascal - Wikipedia

Supposedly the family cat was given to her and made a scapegoat for the otherwise doomed child. But that Pascal endured a serious and potentially fatal childhood illness during which his parents desperately tried all kinds of fanciful cures and treatments seems very likely.

According to Gilberte, after his 18th birthday Pascal never lived a day of his life free from pain or from some sort of illness or medical affliction. The most common medical opinion is that he contracted gastrointestinal tuberculosis in early childhood and that manifestations of the disease, along with signs of possible concurrent nephritis or rheumatoid arthritis, recurred periodically throughout his lifetime.

The accounts of his pathology are also consistent with migraine, irritable bowel syndrome, and fibromyalgia — a complex of illnesses often found together and which also frequently occur in combination with symptoms of anxiety, depression, and emotional distress.

Scholarly interest in this matter involves more than just idle curiosity and medical detective-work. Affliction and disease, physical or emotional trauma, a natural disadvantage or disability have often served as an added motive or accelerator for high-level creative achievement.

Examples abound — from the ancient legend of the blind and vagabond Homer to the documented histories of modern creative figures like Isaac Newton, Van Gogh, Stephen Hawking, and Christy Brown. Young Pascal was taught Latin and Greek as well as history, geography, and philosophy — all on an impromptu schedule, including during meals and at various hours throughout the day.

Civil and canon law were also part of a varied curriculum that included study of the Bible and the Church Fathers. He taught his son his own cardinal principle that whatever is a matter of faith should not also be treated as a matter of reason; and vice-versa.

Blaise pascals influence on mathematics and science

It is a tenet that Pascal took to heart and followed throughout his career. A passionate student who delved earnestly into each new subject, he absorbed new material, including, at a later period, the most arcane and technical components of theology quickly and effortlessly.

However, his learning, while deep in a few areas, was never broad and was in some ways less remarkable for what it included than for what it left out.

Blaise pascals influence on mathematics and science

In addition, because of the sequestered, hermetic, entirely private form of his schooling, he never experienced any of the personal contacts or opportunities for social development that most young people, including even novice monks in monastic schools, commonly do.

To what extent this may have deformed or limited his social and interpersonal skills it is hard to say. He was known to be temperamentally impatient with and demanding of others while sometimes seeming arrogant and self-absorbed.

At a later point in his career, he fully acknowledged his deficiencies and indeed chastised himself for his social ambition and intellectual vanity. Pascal was not widely read in the classics or in contemporary literature. Though he was well acquainted with Aristotelian and Scholastic thought, philosophy for him consisted mainly of Epictetus, Montaigne, and the traditional debate between Stoicism and Epicureanism.

But whatever he may have lacked in physical education, humanistic studies, and art appreciation, Pascal more than made up for in his favored pursuits.Blaise Pascal (/ p æ ˈ s k æ l, p ɑː ˈ s k (–), who also had an interest in science and mathematics, was a local judge and member of the "Noblesse de Robe".

Pascal had two sisters, the younger Jacqueline and the elder Gilberte. Pascal continued to influence mathematics throughout his . - Blaise Pascal Blaise Pascal was a French mathematician, physicist, and religious philosopher. He had many important contributions to the mathematics and physics such as: the construction of mechanical calculators, considerations on probability theory, the study of fluids, concepts of the pressure and vacuum, and the Pascal Triangle.

Blaise Pascal (–) Blaise Pascal was a French philosopher, mathematician, scientist, inventor, and theologian. In mathematics, he was an early pioneer in the fields of . By all accounts, Pascal was an odd fellow. He spent much of his short adult life torn between his love of mathematics and science, and the world of the ultra-strict Jansenists, a fundamentalist Catholic sect.

Great Creation Scientists: Blaise Pascal (–) Great Creation Scientists: Blaise Pascal (–) Blaise began attending weekly lectures in mathematics. It was from these weekly meetings of mathematicians that the French Academy of Sciences later developed.

this devout Christian made outstanding contributions to science. By age 10, Pascal was doing original experiments in mathematics and physical science. To help his father, who was a tax collector, he invented the .

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